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VOL 24 – ISSUE 1 – 2020

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Articles

Hatred Towards Ahmadi Muslims Permeates More Spheres Than We Think About

A Regional Nazim Tabligh posted a message condemning the terror attacks in Paris and promoting the peaceful teachings of Islam. However, hatred towards the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community meant that such a message of peace was not well received by some.

I posted something on my social media accounts recently regarding the incidents in France; these were quotes of Hazrat Khalifatul-Masih Vaba condemning terrorism and stating that Islam is a religion of peace. To my surprise, my post went viral, but not exactly in the way one would hope. I woke up to an astounding amount of abuse on Linkedin. Being an Ahmadi Muslim, it was, of course, the usual group of individuals declaring me to be well on my “way to hell”, and that I would partake in “curses of all 1.2 billion other Muslims” (I’m quite sure the guy who said that didn’t ask all of them).

It’s very difficult reasoning with such people. As Ahmadi Muslims we do, as always, try to prove through our conduct that Islam is a religion of peace, not hate. But examples of such practice fall upon deaf ears.

What’s worse is that my post was literally defending Islam. The French President labeled Islam as a “religion in crisis”. My post merely pointed out that, in reality, that was not the case and that it was those identifying as Christian, whose numbers are dwindling. My post was nothing but condemning the recent attacks while defending the beautiful teachings of Islam. However, I was shocked with the hate I received, from those identifying as Muslim. I am sure they do not know what Islam truly means.

Yet on the other hand, I was very much moved by the messages of love that were directed my way. U nderstandably, there were people that were genuinely confused about what was wrong with what I had said; they were unaware of the prejudice that many Muslims harbour against the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community. Here are some of the messages of support I received:

One non-Muslim gentlemen posted a comment saying: “I’m struggling to understand some of the horrendous and vitriolic comments that I’ve read in response to this post.”

Another message read: “The people commenting frivolously on a post related to condemning a horrid attack on a religion is being condemned by the believers, why are you guys even commenting on something you do not agree with. You can choose to ignore instead of hurling abuses or simply get yourself excused from Mr. Farasat’s professional network.”

A lady posted a comment which read: “Just fallen upon this post. I am of no religion. When I read the post I thought how good that someone is condemning the acts of violence that have been committed. When reading the comments WOW, some of you guys putting curses on the person who has written this post, being so hateful and saying that if he doesn’t follow the last prophet and those teachings that he can’t be a Muslim. I think whatever religion you follow you should advocate peace, however many of the comments on this post are completely awful and just go to show that if people are not following your teachings you hate them, you truly hate them… what a very sad state of affairs.”

Nevertheless, I feel sorry for all those who misunderstood the whole context of the post and were attacking me personally. But this demonstrates that if such hate can occur on a professional platform, one that has nothing to do with religion per se, then imagine how deeply the hatred of Ahmadi Muslims permeates those societies where persecution is backed by law.  We need to educate people including ourselves more than ever.

My post reached over 81,000 views (growing still). I urge all Khuddam to use social media as a tool to spread the message of love and peace as much as possible. Just imagine if a single effort can make such a big difference, then what can the collective achieve? Honestly, I am not an Imam but a normal Ahmadi Muslim who just loves his faith, his Khalifah and his religion. The abuse I received did move me quite a bit.  After hours in a state of disturbance, a light from within me boosted my faith and gave me so many reasons to keep continuing to spread the Islamic message of peace and love between all people.

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History

Moral Ethics – Address of Hazrat Khalifatul-Masih IV (rh) to Atfalul Ahmadiyya UK at the Annual Atfal Rally in 1993

“I will now turn briefly to another point. Righteousness and self confidence. You have advantages from living in a powerful and advanced country of the world but you have disadvantages also. There are good points and bad points. The bad points are cultural and moral deterioration. The British people do not realise that culture is something that can be totally disassociated from moral responsibility. In the name of culture they feel they can do anything and no one can stop them or restrict them. They feel they are free to do whatever they please, with the result, that they step into areas which Allah forbids. They trespass religious code and ethics in the name of culture and freedom. They violate the Word of God and moral principles which are accepted universally. This is an area of danger and I must warn you of it. I have come across some cases of children who go astray in teenage years to lead a life not of goodness but are told that they are free to do what they want. [As if they are told] who are your parents and religious leaders to tell you what to do? You are free, it’s a free country, enjoy yourself. This is the insinuation of what they are told by teachers and other students and they do not understand the underlying trap in this teaching. So I must warn you against this type of philosophy of freedom. They are talking of freedom in an area which does not belong to them. They say God and parents have no right to interfere in that area. It is similar to your parents telling you that you are free as a person, so why respect the laws of England or any other country. You may do what you please. You may steal, mug people, bribe and be bribed – enjoy yourself, this country is yours, this is your land and no one can stop you. If your parents were to teach you this will the society accept it? Will they not react and call it a rebellion against the law of the land? They certainly would as this is their area where they enjoy strength and power. And that will be their reaction if someone from elsewhere interferes in their area of command, and yet they shamelessly interfere where they have no right to. They interfere in the area of God’s commandments, and religious ethics and moral values. The area that belongs to your parents and religious leaders [in such matters] you should listen to them. This should be clearly understood.”

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History

Moments From History – The First Adhan And Namaz In Paris

30 October 1924 was a rainy day in Paris. As Hazrat Musleh Maudra walked into the first mosque of the city (which was under construction) many people gathered around him in awe. The officer incharge of construction proceeded to accompany Huzoorra to the Mehrab, which had been cleaned out so that prayer could be offered. Huzoorra instructed Hazrat Hafiz Roshan Alira to call the Adhan – the first in a Paris mosque. After the Adhan was called Hazrat Musleh Maudra lead the Zuhr and Asr prayers; these were the first congregational prayers offered in the first mosque of Paris, France.

In this photo Hazrat Musleh Maudra inspects the Mosque during its construction. This is a photo from the same day.

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